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Red star rogue : the untold story of a Soviet submarine's nuclear strike attempt on the U.S. / Kenneth Sewell with Clint Richmond.

By: Sewell, Kenneth (Kenneth R.).
Contributor(s): Richmond, Clint.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, c2005Description: 305 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0743261127 :.Subject(s): K-129 (Submarine) | Submarine disasters -- Soviet Union | Soviet Union. Voenno-Morskoĭ Flot -- Submarine forces | Russia (Federation). Voenno-Morskoĭ Flot -- Submarine forces | Cold WarSummary: This book reads like a Tom Clancy novel, but it is all true. Today our greatest fear is that terrorists may someday acquire a nuclear weapon and use it against us. In fact, they have already tried. In 1968 a Soviet submarine sank off Hawaii, hundreds of miles closer to American shores than it should have been. Evidence strongly suggests that the sub sank while attempting to fire a nuclear missile, most likely at Pearl Harbor. We now know that the Soviets had lost track of the sub; it had become a rogue. While the Soviets searched, U.S. intelligence was able to recover the sunken sub, and it became clear that the rogue was attempting to mimic a Chinese submarine, almost certainly with the intention of provoking a war between the U.S. and China. Could the information gleaned from the sunken sub have been a decisive factor shaping the new policies of détente between the Americans and the Soviets, and opening China to the West?--From publisher description.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book Speedway
Adult Area
Non-fiction 359.93 SEW (Browse shelf) 1 Available 35550430786874
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (p. [275]-294) and index.

This book reads like a Tom Clancy novel, but it is all true. Today our greatest fear is that terrorists may someday acquire a nuclear weapon and use it against us. In fact, they have already tried. In 1968 a Soviet submarine sank off Hawaii, hundreds of miles closer to American shores than it should have been. Evidence strongly suggests that the sub sank while attempting to fire a nuclear missile, most likely at Pearl Harbor. We now know that the Soviets had lost track of the sub; it had become a rogue. While the Soviets searched, U.S. intelligence was able to recover the sunken sub, and it became clear that the rogue was attempting to mimic a Chinese submarine, almost certainly with the intention of provoking a war between the U.S. and China. Could the information gleaned from the sunken sub have been a decisive factor shaping the new policies of détente between the Americans and the Soviets, and opening China to the West?--From publisher description.

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